Chinese Spring Festival Greetings

On the Lunar New Year’s Eve, Chinese people starts to greet each other through text or voice happy New Year messages, while later exchange Chinese New Year greetings face to face when visiting each other during the festival.

 

过年好!

guò nián hǎo

On the Lunar New Year’s Eve, Chinese people starts to greet each other through text or voice happy New Year messages, while later exchange Chinese New Year greetings face to face when visiting each other during the festival.

过年好!

guò nián hǎo

We can add beginning like "祝您 (zhù nín)" or "祝你 (zhù nǐ)" ahead of the greetings.


"祝 (zhù)" means "wish", "您 (nín)" and "你 (nǐ)" means "you", the person to whom you send the wishes. The word "您" is more formal than "你". To show respects, "祝您" is usually used for the elders or superiors, "祝你" is used for the young or close friends.


The most popular Chinese New Year greeting in southern China (Cantonese-speaking regions) is gung hay fat choy (恭喜发财 gōng xǐ fā cái), which is a blessing for wealth and prosperity.